The use of imagination in lines composed a few miles above tintern abbey by william wordsworth

A good relationship with nature helps individuals connect to both the spiritual and the social worlds. Recollecting his wanderings allows him to transcend his present circumstances. Once again I see These hedge-rows, hardly hedge-rows, little lines Of sportive wood run wild: Active wandering allows the characters to experience and participate in the vastness and beauty of the natural world.

Its style is therefore very fluid and natural; it reads as easily as if it were a prose piece. While here I stand, not only with the sense Of present pleasure, but with pleasing thoughts That in this moment there is life and food For future years.

He had previously visited the area as a troubled twenty-three-year-old in August The speaker of this poem takes comfort in a walk he once took after he has returned to the grit and desolation of city life. In those days, he says, nature made up his whole world: Lines 1—49 Revisiting the natural beauty of the Wye after five years fills the poet with a sense of "tranquil restoration".

In the second edition of Lyrical BalladsWordsworth noted: The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion: The Power of the Human Mind Wordsworth praised the power of the human mind.

For I have learned To look on nature, not as in the hour 90 Of thoughtless youth, but hearing oftentimes The still, sad music of humanity, Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power To chasten and subdue. Wordsworth argued in the preface to Lyrical Ballads that poetry sprang from the calm remembrance of passionate emotional experiences.

The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion: Additionally, the presence of his sister gives him a view of himself as he imagines himself to have been as a youth. Using memory and imagination, individuals could overcome difficulty and pain.

In that case, too, she will remember what the woods meant to the speaker, the way in which, after so many years of absence, they became more dear to him—both for themselves and for the fact that she is in them. All manifestations of the natural world—from the highest mountain to the simplest flower—elicit noble, elevated thoughts and passionate emotions in the people who observe these manifestations.

Nor wilt thou then forget, That after many wanderings, many years Of absence, these steep woods and lofty cliffs, And this green pastoral landscape, were to me More dear, both for themselves and for thy sake! For thou art with me here upon the banks Of this fair river; thou my dearest Friend, My dear, dear Friend; and in thy voice I catch The language of my former heart, and read My former pleasures in the shooting lights Of thy wild eyes.

The speaker resolves to think of the leech gatherer whenever his enthusiasm for poetry or belief in himself begins to wane.

This democratic view emphasizes individuality and uniqueness. If this Be but a vain belief, yet, oh! As Wordsworth explains in The Prelude, a love of nature can lead to a love of humankind.

But the speaker also imagines his remembrances of the past as a kind of light, which illuminate his soul and give him the strength to live. Nor, perchance, If I should be, where I no more can hear Thy voice, nor catch from thy wild eyes these gleams Of past existence, wilt thou then forget That on the banks of this delightful stream We stood together; and that I, so long A worshipper of Nature, hither came, Unwearied in that service:Wordsworth praised the power of the human mind.

Using memory and imagination, individuals could overcome difficulty and pain. For instance, the speaker in “Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey” () relieves his loneliness with memories of nature, while the leech gatherer in “Resolution and Independence” () perseveres cheerfully in the face of poverty by the exertion of.

William Wordsworth's LINES WRITTEN A FEW MILES ABOVE TINTERN ABBEY from Lyrical Ballads [London: J.

& A. Arch, ]. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, On Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour.

July 13, By William Wordsworth. Rousseau- Confessions Wordsworth- Line composed a Few Miles Above Tintern ABbey, The world is too much with Us, My heart leaps Up. Coleridge- Kubla Khan Shelley- Ode to the West Wid Questions from Keats-Ode to a Grecian Urn, Ode to a Nightingale, To Autumn Browning- My Last Duchess Tennyson-.

Full Title: "Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey; On Revisiting the Banks of the Wye During a Tour, July 13, " "Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey" was written in July of and published as the last poem of Lyrical Ballads, also in At the age of twenty-three (in.

The title, Lines Written (or Composed) a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13,is often abbreviated simply to Tintern Abbey, although that building does not appear within the killarney10mile.com was written by William Wordsworth after a walking tour with his sister in this section of the Welsh killarney10mile.com description of his encounters with the.

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The use of imagination in lines composed a few miles above tintern abbey by william wordsworth
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